Measurement

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When I teach measurement I all the time surprise how kids make it so dang tough!

“Mrs. Braun, I measured my desk and it’s 2 inches long!”  …..wait, WHAT!?!

 Every yr I’ve taught, I encounter a child who finds a distinct method to measure incorrectly.  After some time it begins to get humorous!  I’ve discovered that kids want numerous alternatives to observe measuring and receiving suggestions on their approach.  For my very own sanity I’ve discovered some methods to assist kids manage what they want to find out about measurement and make the repeated observe enjoyable.

One measurement guide kids actually take pleasure in is Twelve Snails to One Lizard by Susan Hightower.  In this story Milo the beaver wants to use measurement to repair his leaky dam.  He traces up squirmy snails, lizards, and snakes earlier than discovering a greater method to measure.  I like how this guide helps kids relate items of measurement to animals that they’ll keep in mind.  Otherwise it’s really easy for the kids to overlook which unit is longer or shorter.  When  asking kids to estimate how many yards lengthy the playground is I might say, “You know, yards, like a snake.”  I created an anchor chart so we might keep in mind these items and a few of the superior college students might begin occupied with how to convert backwards and forwards between items.

Measurement approach positively takes some observe. I picked the most typical methods kids would “screw it up” and addressed them with this anchor chart.  Of course kids will all the time discover different inventive methods to measure…however we do what we will : )

The Common Core standards require that college students find out about totally different instruments for measurement and have the option to select the suitable device for a given state of affairs.  This anchor chart helps college students keep in mind the primary measurement instruments they are going to encounter and which items these instruments measure.

One trick that may actually assist kids internalize the scale of items is to give them “body benchmarks,” that’s, part of their physique that’s shut to the size of a selected unit.  Here are three that I discover useful for kids.  Then whenever you ask them “which is bigger, an inch or a centimeter?” they’ll take into consideration how the center part on their pointer finger (about an inch) is larger than the width of their pinky (a few centimeter).

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Hannah Braun

Hannah Braun
Hannah Braun is a former instructor with eight years of expertise within the classroom and a grasp’s diploma in early childhood schooling. She designs participating, organized classroom resources for 1st-Third grade academics.

Author: Hannah Braun

Hannah Braun is a former instructor with eight years of expertise within the classroom and a grasp’s diploma in early childhood schooling. She designs participating, organized classroom resources for 1st-Third grade academics.