Crash Course in Phonics, part 2

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Phonics Crash Course, Part 2, phonics rules and terminology that they should have taught you in college, but didn't. a perfect cheat sheet for kindergarten, first,, and second grade teachers

Everything you wanted to find out about educating phonics, you realized in faculty….proper?  Wrong!  My professors have been nice, however there actually wasn’t a course devoted to educating phonics.  Once you might have your individual classroom it doesn’t take lengthy to notice that the phrase “sound it out” will solely get your college students up to now.   Don’t fear!  I’ve compiled a few of the phonics tidbits I’ve realized alongside the way in which.  Check out my phonics crash course, part 1 here.  And now, maintain on to your hats as a result of right here comes the crash course in phonics, part 2!

 

Crash Course in Phonics, part 2, everything you wish you would have learned about teaching phonics when you were in college

 

 

Blends– Blends are two (or generally three) letters that make a definite sound corresponding to /bl/, /cr/, or /st/.  You can hear all of the letter sounds in a mix.  Blends are usually realized in 1st or 2nd grade.

Digraphs– I actually don’t suppose college students want to know the phrase “digraph” however as a instructor you’ll see it in your curriculum.  These are pairs of letters that work collectively to make one utterly new sound.  Examples embody th, sh, and ch.  Kids want to memorize these chunks (phonograms, if you would like to get technical) as a result of they’ll’t be sounded out.

Vowel Digraphs– Vowels in English are so tough as a result of they’ll make a couple of sound and if you mix two of them, who is aware of what’s going to occur!  One rule that lecturers often inform their college students is, “when two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking.”  It works for phrases like rain, seat, or goat.  I used to be very stunned to be taught that in case you have a look at essentially the most generally used phrases, the rule solely truly works 36% of the time (see All About Learning Press for extra on that).  I feel the “two vowels walking” rule is a good place to begin.  I let college students know that it doesn’t at all times work, and when it doesn’t we strive a unique vowel sound.  I’ve discovered that getting comfy with vowel digraph (or vowel crew) phrases is a serious part of phonics studying in 2nd grade. (see vowel digraph apply HERE)

R-Controlled Vowels– You’ll additionally hear these referred to as “bossy-r” phrases.  The story goes that when r comes after a vowel, it appears to be like again and managers that vowel into making a unique sound.  The -ar sample is enjoyable to be taught as a result of that’s what a pirate says! -Er, -ir, and -ur all make the identical sound.  I inform my college students it’s “RRRR like a motorcycle starting.”  -Or could make the identical motorbike sound (like in world, or phrase) or it may make a unique sound (like corn and fork).

Check out R-controlled vowel apply HERE

Soft C and G– If you’re employed with youthful college students, you’ve most likely seen them read the phrase “city” as “kitty.”   Here we’re once more with letters making a couple of sound…thanks quite a bit, English!  The smooth C appears like /s/ and the smooth g appears like /j/.  Check out the catchy track on the image above.  It’s so annoying that after you sing it a number of occasions, you solely want to sing the primary line to assist a scholar who’s caught on a phrase and they’ll instantly say “OK, OK, I GOT IT!” to make you give up ; )

If you’re in search of supplies to assist you to teach phonics, take a look at my posters, facilities, mini glossary books, phrase kinds, and extra!

posters, mini word list books, centers, word sorts, and more!

 

There is certainly far more that might be stated on this subject.  In reality, I really feel a Crash Course in Phonics, part three approaching.  Follow me utilizing one of many decisions on my sidebar so that you don’t miss out!

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The superior clipart in this publish comes from Sarah Pecorino Illustration.

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Hannah Braun

Hannah Braun
Hannah Braun is a former instructor with eight years of expertise in the classroom and a grasp’s diploma in early childhood training. She designs partaking, organized classroom resources for 1st-Third grade lecturers.

Author: Hannah Braun

Hannah Braun is a former instructor with eight years of expertise in the classroom and a grasp’s diploma in early childhood training. She designs partaking, organized classroom resources for 1st-Third grade lecturers.